All posts tagged: the wizard of oz

12 Days of Bookmas – What to buy – The Artist

Hello everyone, and apologies for not posting some recommendations yesterday but I did the biggest experiment I have ever done at work and I was just far too exhausted when I got home to take photos. But today I have a great bunch of recommendations for those people out there who love beautifully illustrated books. 1 – Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, Illustrated by Anna Bond There are so many beautifully illustrated versions of Alice in Wonderland out there, and who doesn’t like a beautiful copy of Alice in Wonderland? No one. Matching (sort of) the Puffin in Bloom series of children’s books, this edition is full of beautiful and vibrant illustrations with a bit of a folky feel. If this edition isn’t doing it for you but you like the idea of giving a beautiful edition of Alice in Wonderland, you can always check out my Five Beautiful Editions of Alice in Wonderland post. But if you do like this edition, you can get it here: The Book Depository, Amazon. 2 – The Resurrectionist: The Lost …

Fiction for the Fictional – Alice (in which I make a list of book recs for Alice from Alice in Wonderland)

I’ve decided to do this new thing where I list (everyone loves lists!) what books I would recommend a particular fictional character. This first list will feature the protagonist from my favourite classic, Alice, from Alice in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass by Lewis Carroll. I hope you enjoy this new little feature of mine (and maybe join in? Yes?). MY BOOK RECOMMENDATIONS FOR ALICE: The Wizard of Oz by Frank L. Baum I don’t think it’s particularly had to see why I would recommend this book to Alice, I think she would quite thoroughly relate to Dorothy and enjoy her adventures. The Never Ending Story by Michael Ende Another story of a child being swept away to a magical land. I think Alice would particularly fall in love with Falcor, and probably wish she had his company rather than her rather unhelpful Cheshire Cat. Peter Pan by J. M. Barrie This is another obvious one, I think. Both Peter and Alice’s adventures begin as almost a way to avoid everything adultish (perfectly understandable).  I can …