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Dear Australian publishers,

I’ve seen so many posts about saving Australian Literature (see here) and it’s really amazing that so many people, even those who aren’t Australian, care about this issue. With so many people coming out to support the Australian publishers, I hope that the government realises that it should not pass these new laws that would significantly harm authors (Australian publishers are doing enough to harm themselves without anyone’s help), but I want Australian publishers to stay in business, because I want authors to be able to make a decent living off their books, and I want all the lovely people I’ve dealt with from Australian publishers to keep their jobs and keep doing great things. I do buy a lot of books from Australia, Dymock is my happy place, and my Dymocks Gold loyalty card will attest to the fact that I do buy a lot of books in the country. But I buy far more from overseas. I hate to be the bearer of bad news and I would love Australia to have a thriving publishing …

Book Review: You by Caroline Kepnes

So many people have recommended this to me, and it took me a long time to get around to reading it. But once I picked it up I just couldn’t put it down. What’s it about: Narcissistic (yet hilarious and clever) boy stalks narcissistic (awful) girl. What I thought: Unlike most thrillers, this doesn’t revolve around a mystery, but is more of a character-driven story, and it’s all narrated by the stalker, Joe. And he is a great protagonist. I was sceptical when I had read other reviews of this book where people said that it’s difficult to not like Joe. I was like “how could you ever sympathise with the stalker? just no.” but despite the fact that he does awful, awful things, he’s also really funny with an excellent sense of humor and the social commentary is excellent. It also doesn’t hurt that the people he’s doing those awful things to are HORRIBLE. Beck, the stalkee, is just the worst, and it’s really difficult to feel sorry for her. There are so many awful characters in …

Book Review: A Court of Mist and Fury by The Queen, Sarah J. Maas

Hey, everyone! I’m back from the dead! Life had been closely resembling the seventh layer of hell for a little while, and I was sort of dead inside, but not I have a new little puppy thawing out my frozen heart, so I’m back! Yay! Anyway, thank you very much to Bloomsbury for sending me a copy of A Court of Mist and Fury for review. As per my usual protocol, this being a sequel, I will not be mentioning spoilers for either book in the series, so this will probably be a rather short review. What is this series about? It’s a fantastic re-telling of Beauty and the Beast, but with faeries and super dark scary monsters, and an awesome artist/hunter heroine. If you want more information about the first book in the series, A Court of Thorns and Roses, you can see my review of that here. What did I think? Uh… I loved it, of course. It’s Sarah J. Maas and she has some kind of God-like storytelling powers that make me …

Book Review: Morning Star by Pierce Brown

Morning Star is the third, and final, book in the Red Rising trilogy – if you want to check out my review of Red Rising, you can do so here, but this review wont contain any spoilers for any of the books. This review will not focus on any specifics, but be more general babbling about how much I love it, because I don’t want to give ANY THING away. What is it about: Well, Red Rising is kind of like The Hunger Games, only set on Mars (and in space!), and way better (that is my opinion and I will not apologise for it. The Hunger Games was good, but I believe this series is way better. It’s darker and a lot more clever). Firstly, we are dealing with a dystopian society where how much you are oppressed depends on your colour. Darrow is a Red (lowest of the low), and also a ‘Helldiver’ (super extreme miner). Things happen and he ends up joining a rebellion to take down the Golds (the most oppressive …

Why does YA have to be about teenagers? Why do books about teenagers have to be YA?

There seems to be some rather apparent inconsistencies in the definition of the YA genre. Particularly with whether it is books about teenagers, or whether it is books aimed at teenagers. I find that it is usually always defined as the former, as every YA book I have ever read features a teenage protagonist, although a number of exceptions exist that do revolve around children. Now I do understand that readers like to read about protagonists they can relate to, that struggle with the same issues that they do. That’s perfectly understandable. Teenagers are not adults. They are teenagers. There is a vast amount of psychological data that shows teenagers are different to adults in many capacities. It’s why we, as humans, have such a long period of adolescence, which is absent from almost all other animals. Almost all other animals reach maturity quite young. But because of the huge amount of information humans need to learn, we go through a prolonged period of childhood, followed by a very distinct period of adolescence. There are profound …

Two Bookhauls!

So I haven’t been buying a lot of books lately as a) I haven’t had a lot of time for reading as I am (STILL) writing my thesis, b) we are kind of about to start renovating and I’ve been buying kitchens and couches instead (yeah. I will all the awards for adulting). But these are just some books I’ve bought since my last book haul, and the books I got for Christmas (which I forgot that I didn’t post on here because I was lacking a computer for a while. Fogive me). First up! Christmas bookhaul of amazingness. I got some pretty awesome books for Christmas. Let me introduce you to them (with lots of CAPS because of EXCITEMENT!). I got a Penguin Library Edition of The Time Machine by H.G. Wells (Because I LOVE H.G. Wells!), an AMAZING edition of The Girl on the Train by Paula Hawkins. Sorry but the only place I can find it is at Dymocks (which is where I got it because Dymocks is my one true love), …

Book Review: Six of Crows by Leigh Bardugo

Let me start by saying, when this book came out, I had no intention of reading it. As far as I was concerned after the rubbish pit that was Siege and Storm, I didn’t even have any interest in finishing The Grisha Trilogy, despite owning Ruin and Rising. But, after seeing so many people rave about it on Tumblr. I finally decided to give it a go. And I’m pretty glad I did. What’s it about: A crew of loveable criminals attempt a seemingly impossible heist. And there’s magic! “A gambler, a convict, a wayward son, a lost Grisha, a Suli girl who had become a killer, a boy from the Barrel who had become something worse.” What I thought: I must say that it wildly exceeded my expectations. So much so that I am now considering reading Ruin and Rising. The lovable characters are definitely at the forefront of this novel, and each is given a nice amount of complexity and backstory as the novel changes perspective each chapter. And that brings me to the changing perspective. Not …

Book Slumps: Heat = No Reading

I have to admit, I didn’t really understand how people really got into reading slumps until recently. I’ve heard people blame reading slumps on a number of things, from reading really good books, to reading really bad ones. But it was never really a problem for me. I’d been in tiny reading slumps before, but they usually didn’t last more than a few days. So I never really got why everyone seemed so plagued by the dreaded reading slump. What could be so bad about just not reading for a couple of days? Honestly I thought you were all just a bunch of babies. Lovable, cute, adorable babies, but babies. But now I totally understand… READING SLUMPS ARE THE WORST. They are worse than Britta. AND THEY ARE SO HARD TO ESCAPE! A few months ago when I started writing my thesis and my reading progress went completely downhill. This was completely understandable as I was spending about 14 hours a day writing. But since I took a break from writing, my reading hasn’t picked …

Book Review – Illuminae by Amie Kaufman and Jay Kristoff

IT IS JUST SO AWESOME!!! READ IT. READ IT. READ IT. READ IT. READ IT. READ IT. READ IT. READ IT. READ IT. READ IT. READ IT. READ IT. READ IT. READ IT. READ IT. READ IT. READ IT. READ IT. READ IT. READ IT. READ IT. READ IT. READ IT. READ IT. READ IT. READ IT. READ IT. READ IT. READ IT. READ IT. READ IT. READ IT. READ IT. READ IT. READ IT. READ IT. READ IT. READ IT. READ IT. READ IT. READ IT. READ IT. READ IT. READ IT. READ IT. READ IT. READ IT. READ IT. A BILLION/FIVE STARS!  

Book Review: The Graveyard Book by Neil Gaiman

Reading anything by Neil Gaiman is always a really special experience, but it really doesn’t compare with listening to Neil Gaiman read Neil Gaiman. Although I have a physical copy of this book, I decided to listen to the audiobook of this because Neil Gaiman often reads his books himself, and he does it really well. What it’s about: This is the story of a boy who is raised by the residents of a graveyard (as in the dead ones, not like an old gravedigger named Joe. The ghosts) after his family is brutally murdered. What I thought: Loved it. Loved it. Loved it a lot. I don’t read a huge amount of middle grade books because I usually find that they tend to beat you over the head with obvious conclusions (which is fine when they are being read by their intended audience who may need that, but I tend to find it annoying). But I do occasionally dip my toe in the middle grade pool for books I think will be worth it …