All posts filed under: Reviews

Book Review – Illuminae by Amie Kaufman and Jay Kristoff

IT IS JUST SO AWESOME!!! READ IT. READ IT. READ IT. READ IT. READ IT. READ IT. READ IT. READ IT. READ IT. READ IT. READ IT. READ IT. READ IT. READ IT. READ IT. READ IT. READ IT. READ IT. READ IT. READ IT. READ IT. READ IT. READ IT. READ IT. READ IT. READ IT. READ IT. READ IT. READ IT. READ IT. READ IT. READ IT. READ IT. READ IT. READ IT. READ IT. READ IT. READ IT. READ IT. READ IT. READ IT. READ IT. READ IT. READ IT. READ IT. READ IT. READ IT. READ IT. A BILLION/FIVE STARS!  

Book Review – Lirael by Garth Nix

This is the second book in The Old Kingdom series by Garth Nix (sometimes referred to as the Abhorsen series), if you haven’t read the first book in the series, Sabriel, you can check out my review here (if you like. No pressure). As with most of my reviews of sequels, this one will be short and will contain no spoilers of Sabriel or Lirael. What’s it about: Sensible girls, less sensible boys, Necromancy, and sassy talking animals. So the first book in the series, Sabriel, is about a young girl who is the daughter of the Abhorsen (Big Daddy Necromancer). When her father goes missing, she must travel through the Old Kingdom, which is full of dead things that want to eat your face, to find him. And the fact that Sabriel is one of the most sensible protagonists I’ve ever encountered, just makes this book lovely to read. So what about Lirael? Lirael is the story of two separate characters, about 14 years after Sabriel. The story of Lirael starts off with poor …

Book Review: Railsea by China Mieville

 “People have wanted to narrate since first we banged rocks together & wondered about fire. There’ll be tellings as long as there are any of us here, until the stars disappear one by one like turned-out lights.” What’s it about? Basically, it’s a retelling of Moby Dick, but instead of a whale, we have a giant carnivorous mole rat, and instead of a ship, we have a train. Sounds awesome? That’s because it is. This is one of China Mieville’s works that is more suited to a younger audience, but this guy can really write for any age. “As long as humanity has rolled on the railsea, the rigours & vigours & bloody triggers of the underground have been legendary.” What did I think? It’s completely brilliant. Go read it now. I’ve never read a more cleverly written book in my life. This was just brilliant. It has a non-traditional sentence structure that reads a bit like poetry. I actually found myself only reading this book home alone because the writing was just so wonderful …

Book Review: Horrorstor by Grady Hendrix

So just a quick review for this one. This book was released last halloween I believe, but I really enjoyed it, and thought it deserved a mention again this year. What’s it about: A haunted Orsk store (fictional equivalent of Ikea). When strange things start happening at their work, they decide to spend the night…. it does not end well. What I thought: I really enjoyed this book! There is something about it that gives it a zombieland (but with ghosts instead of zombies) vibe. It’s a really fun horror read. Having had my first trip to Ikea only recently, and having to miss my lunch plans because I was “trapped” in the store and couldn’t get out, I felt that this book perfectly captured that trapped feeling. I loved the store manager character, Basil. If Moss from The IT Crowd managed an Ikea, I think he would a a bit like Basil. The best thing about this book is that it doesn’t take itself too seriously. It’s a really fun book. And it’s quite …

Book Review: The Martian by Andy Weir

Sorry I have been completely absent of late. I am currently writing up my PhD thesis. It’s been taking up pretty much all of my time. One might say I’ve been sciencing the shit out of things. On to the review. I’ve been meaning to read this for a really long time, but I finally got around to it and I loved it. What’s it about: An astronaut is left alone on Mars when his team leaves him for dead (whoops!). He has to try to survive alone on Mars until he can be rescued. What I thought: This book is so entertaining. Everyone I know who has read this all say the same thing: they read it in one sitting. It is absolutely impossible to put down. I though the format in which this book was written both worked and didn’t at the same time. Mark Watney (astronaut left on Mars)’s perspective is written in the format of his log. It works in one way because it’s absolutely hilarious. I found the whole end …

Book Review: Only Ever Yours by Louise O’neill

This book is like a massive middle finger to gender inequality and the objectification of women in contemporary society. It is extremely harrowing and it literally gave me nightmares, but I think it’s so important for young women to read it. What it’s about: I think the author herself best described this book as a cross between The Handmaid’s Tale and Mean Girls. Set in a truly horrific dystopian society, where females are raised in ‘schools’ designed to prepare girls to be basically subservient wives or concubines (or the most horrible of all – Chastities – which are basically the teachers of the next generation). being pretty is of the utmost importance and slogans like ‘fat girls must be made obsolete’ following them everywhere. What I thought: This book is incredibly difficult to read, but I believe it’s incredibly important that people do read this book. It is extremely reminiscent of The Handmaid’s Tale, but I feel it’s a bit more relevant to modern society and the pressures young girls are put under today. I …

Book Review – The Library at Mount Char by Scott Hawkins

Oh my goodness! What a unique read. How am I ever going to review this little oddity? I shall try my hardest! What it’s about: Okay, so there is  library that holds all the secrets of the universe, run by a god. This god, known as Father has twelve apprentices (librarians), who each study a particular catalog (War, Death, Language, Medicine, etc.) and must master it. Their studies aren’t easy, and Father is, for lack of a better term, an absolute sadistic asshole. When he goes missing and the librarians  are locked out of the library, they must all try to solve the mystery of their missing god before his enemies decided to move in and take over. “For all intents and purposes, the power of the Library is infinite. Tonight we’re going to settle who inherits control of reality.” What I thought: Honestly, it’s pretty damn brilliant. It is extremely dark and absolutely one of the oddest books I’ve ever read, but it is just damn good. It kept me up past 2 am several nights this …

Book Review: The Rest of Us Just Live Here by Patrick Ness

Patrick Ness is one of my absolute favourite authors, and it will never cease to amaze me how unique each piece of his work is. And this piece is definitely unique. “Not everyone has to be the Chosen One. Not everyone has to be the guy who saves the world. Most people just have to live their lives the best they can, doing things that are great for them, having great friends, trying to make their lives better, loving people properly. All the while knowing that the world makes no sense but trying to find a way to be happy anyway.” What’s it about:  This book is set in a town where there are  Indie Kids. You know the type, tragically alternative, always the ones that the interesting (and dangerous things happen to). The Bella Swans and the Clary Frays. The ones who fall in love with vampires and fight ghosts. This story is not about them. This story is not about them. This story is about a group of non-chosen ones who just want to …

Book Review: The Humans by Matt Haig

“This book, this actual book, is set right here on Earth. It is about the meaning of life and nothing at all. It is about what it takes to kill somebody, and save them. It is about love and dead poets and wholenut peanut butter. It is about matter and antimatter, everything and nothing, hope and hate. It is about a forty-one-year-old female historian called Isobel and her fifteen year old son named Gulliver and the cleverest mathematician in the world. It is, in short, about how to become a human.” Isn’t that just a fantastic start to a book? I got this book after hearing Becki (or thebooker) from A Word Shaker rave about it. “Men are not from Mars. Women are not from Venus. Do not fall for categories. Everyone is everything. Every ingredient inside a star is inside you, and every personality that ever existed competes in the theatre of your mind for the main role.” What’s it about: Andrew Martin is not Andrew Martin. What Andrew Martin is is an alien inhabiting …

Book Review: Queen of Shadows by Sarah J. Maas

I was sent this book by Bloombury Australia for review… but at the time I hadn’t actually read books two or three in the series. So I have been marathoning this series over the past couple of weeks and I have enjoyed it so so so much! You can see my reviews for Crown of Midnight here, and Heir of Fire here, and my Recom-Monday-Tions post about Throne of Glass here. This is now one of my absolute favourite series! It will be difficult to review this without spoiling anything in the series, but I will try. This series gets better with each consecutive book you read, and Queen of Shadows is by far my favourite. I absolutely couldn’t put it down. There was not a single moment where I felt bored or where my mind wandered to other things. It is just completely all-consuming. There are some new characters in this book who are absolutely delightful, and we finally meet Arrobyn, the King of Assassins that Celaena used to work for, for the first …