All posts filed under: book reviews

Book Review: The Wolf Wilder by Katherine Rundell

“Stories can start revolutions.” What it’s about: A young wolf wilder (someone who takes in formerly domesticated wolves and tries to rehabilitate them so they can again survive in the wild), Feo, is perused by soldiers, and their insane captain, through the Russian wilderness as she attempts to save her mother from being falsely imprisoned, while trying to avoid being swept up in a revolution. What I thought: Well, firstly, this book surprised me in the fact that it is not a fantasy novel, as I had originally expected. At most Feo’s role as a Wolf Wilder could be described as slightly uncanny. But that shouldn’t really count against the book in any way because it is a beautiful little oddity of a book. “People say we can’t do anything about the way the world is; they say it’s set in stone. I say it looks like stone, but it’s mostly paint and cardboard.” This book isn’t one I would recommend to those who require a great deal of action in their novels. This book …

Book Review: The May Queen Murders by Sarah Jude

I was going to wait until my hardcover of this arrived for pretty photography before posting this review, but I’ve become impatient and it seems it’s going to take a while to come as it’s on backorder. What it’s about: The residents of a commune in the Ozarks are terrorized by something coming from the forest at night to mutilate both animals and people. What I thought: First of all, I have to say that this book has a BEAUTIFUL cover, which is what initially drew me to it. I thought it would be a creepy mystery, but it actually had more of a horror vibe to it, and I do love my horror, so that was a bonus. I read this book in less than 24 hours. Once I started I was pretty hooked. Although I really enjoyed this book, it was, in my opinion missing something in that, while it was very readable, it didn’t really make me feel anything. I didn’t really care for any of the characters, as they were all pretty …

Book Review: You by Caroline Kepnes

So many people have recommended this to me, and it took me a long time to get around to reading it. But once I picked it up I just couldn’t put it down. What’s it about: Narcissistic (yet hilarious and clever) boy stalks narcissistic (awful) girl. What I thought: Unlike most thrillers, this doesn’t revolve around a mystery, but is more of a character-driven story, and it’s all narrated by the stalker, Joe. And he is a great protagonist. I was sceptical when I had read other reviews of this book where people said that it’s difficult to not like Joe. I was like “how could you ever sympathise with the stalker? just no.” but despite the fact that he does awful, awful things, he’s also really funny with an excellent sense of humor and the social commentary is excellent. It also doesn’t hurt that the people he’s doing those awful things to are HORRIBLE. Beck, the stalkee, is just the worst, and it’s really difficult to feel sorry for her. There are so many awful characters in …

Book Review: A Court of Mist and Fury by The Queen, Sarah J. Maas

Hey, everyone! I’m back from the dead! Life had been closely resembling the seventh layer of hell for a little while, and I was sort of dead inside, but not I have a new little puppy thawing out my frozen heart, so I’m back! Yay! Anyway, thank you very much to Bloomsbury for sending me a copy of A Court of Mist and Fury for review. As per my usual protocol, this being a sequel, I will not be mentioning spoilers for either book in the series, so this will probably be a rather short review. What is this series about? It’s a fantastic re-telling of Beauty and the Beast, but with faeries and super dark scary monsters, and an awesome artist/hunter heroine. If you want more information about the first book in the series, A Court of Thorns and Roses, you can see my review of that here. What did I think? Uh… I loved it, of course. It’s Sarah J. Maas and she has some kind of God-like storytelling powers that make me …

Book Review: Morning Star by Pierce Brown

Morning Star is the third, and final, book in the Red Rising trilogy – if you want to check out my review of Red Rising, you can do so here, but this review wont contain any spoilers for any of the books. This review will not focus on any specifics, but be more general babbling about how much I love it, because I don’t want to give ANY THING away. What is it about: Well, Red Rising is kind of like The Hunger Games, only set on Mars (and in space!), and way better (that is my opinion and I will not apologise for it. The Hunger Games was good, but I believe this series is way better. It’s darker and a lot more clever). Firstly, we are dealing with a dystopian society where how much you are oppressed depends on your colour. Darrow is a Red (lowest of the low), and also a ‘Helldiver’ (super extreme miner). Things happen and he ends up joining a rebellion to take down the Golds (the most oppressive …

Book Review: Six of Crows by Leigh Bardugo

Let me start by saying, when this book came out, I had no intention of reading it. As far as I was concerned after the rubbish pit that was Siege and Storm, I didn’t even have any interest in finishing The Grisha Trilogy, despite owning Ruin and Rising. But, after seeing so many people rave about it on Tumblr. I finally decided to give it a go. And I’m pretty glad I did. What’s it about: A crew of loveable criminals attempt a seemingly impossible heist. And there’s magic! “A gambler, a convict, a wayward son, a lost Grisha, a Suli girl who had become a killer, a boy from the Barrel who had become something worse.” What I thought: I must say that it wildly exceeded my expectations. So much so that I am now considering reading Ruin and Rising. The lovable characters are definitely at the forefront of this novel, and each is given a nice amount of complexity and backstory as the novel changes perspective each chapter. And that brings me to the changing perspective. Not …

Book Review – Illuminae by Amie Kaufman and Jay Kristoff

IT IS JUST SO AWESOME!!! READ IT. READ IT. READ IT. READ IT. READ IT. READ IT. READ IT. READ IT. READ IT. READ IT. READ IT. READ IT. READ IT. READ IT. READ IT. READ IT. READ IT. READ IT. READ IT. READ IT. READ IT. READ IT. READ IT. READ IT. READ IT. READ IT. READ IT. READ IT. READ IT. READ IT. READ IT. READ IT. READ IT. READ IT. READ IT. READ IT. READ IT. READ IT. READ IT. READ IT. READ IT. READ IT. READ IT. READ IT. READ IT. READ IT. READ IT. READ IT. A BILLION/FIVE STARS!  

Book Review: The Graveyard Book by Neil Gaiman

Reading anything by Neil Gaiman is always a really special experience, but it really doesn’t compare with listening to Neil Gaiman read Neil Gaiman. Although I have a physical copy of this book, I decided to listen to the audiobook of this because Neil Gaiman often reads his books himself, and he does it really well. What it’s about: This is the story of a boy who is raised by the residents of a graveyard (as in the dead ones, not like an old gravedigger named Joe. The ghosts) after his family is brutally murdered. What I thought: Loved it. Loved it. Loved it a lot. I don’t read a huge amount of middle grade books because I usually find that they tend to beat you over the head with obvious conclusions (which is fine when they are being read by their intended audience who may need that, but I tend to find it annoying). But I do occasionally dip my toe in the middle grade pool for books I think will be worth it …

Book Review: Marina by Carlos Ruiz Zafón

“Our body begins to destroy itself from the moment it is born. We are fragile. We’re creatures of passage. All that is left of us are our actions, the good or the evil we do to our fellow humans.” I wrote this review ages ago, but was waiting until I had a physical copy to take photos of… but I’m lazy. So here it is. What’s it about: Oscar is out for a walk one day when he stumbles across an abandoned house and accidentally steals a pocket watch. Racked with guilt, Oscar attempts to return the watch to the house only to find out that the house is not at all abandoned, but occupied by a young girl, Marina, and her sickly father German (I hope I’m spelling that right… I listened to the audiobook so I could be wrong). Marina and Oscar quickly become friends. Marina then tells Oscar of a cemetery where on the last Sunday of every month a veiled woman leaves a single red rose on a grave marked only by a …